Skeletons In Jamestown Revealed To Be Colonial Leaders

Here’s an interesting discovery of skeletons in Jamestown belonging to the 1608-1617 era. Marilyn Scallan Epstein wrote the article and covered the research extensively.

History always has numerous secrets and hidden facts and figures. There will always be something new that archaeologists and historians will discover every day if they keep researching. Due to the various technological advancements, we can dig up more places and gather more information about past civilizations.

An archaeological dig took place in 2013 at Jamestown in Virginia. Researchers found various parts of four different skeletons that belonged to colony leaders. They were not just any colony leaders but the first British leaders who were successful in their attempt to forge a new lifestyle in a different world past the Atlantic.

Scientists did not only take help with archaeology but used different research methods, evidence, skeleton analyses, 3D technology, chemical workings, and genealogical information to get to this conclusion.

A team of scientists used multiple lines of evidence, including archaeology, skeletal analyses, chemical testing, 3-D technology and genealogical research, to single out the names of the four men who died at Jamestown from 1608 through 1617. (Photo by Donald Hurlbert)
A team of scientists used multiple lines of evidence, including archaeology, skeletal analyses, chemical testing, 3-D technology and genealogical research, to single out the names of the four men who died at Jamestown from 1608 through 1617. (Photo by Donald Hurlbert)
Smithsonian forensic anthropologists Doug Owsley and Kari Bruwelheide and colleague Ashley McKeown examine the grave of Rev. Robert Hunt. (Photo by Donald Hurlbert)
Smithsonian forensic anthropologists Doug Owsley and Kari Bruwelheide and colleague Ashley McKeown examine the grave of Rev. Robert Hunt. (Photo by Donald Hurlbert)
The skeletal remains of the Rev. Robert Hunt, the first Anglican minister at Jamestown who served the colony until his death in 1608 around the age of 39. Hunt was buried without a coffin. (Photo by Donald E. Hurlbert)
The skeletal remains of the Rev. Robert Hunt, the first Anglican minister at Jamestown who served the colony until his death in 1608 around the age of 39. Hunt was buried without a coffin. (Photo by Donald E. Hurlbert)
Capt. Gabriel Archer died in late 1609 or early 1610 at the age of 34 during the “starving time” at Jamestown, and was found buried with a captain’s leading staff and an enigmatic silver box. (Photo by Donald E. Hurlbert)
Capt. Gabriel Archer died in late 1609 or early 1610 at the age of 34 during the “starving time” at Jamestown, and was found buried with a captain’s leading staff and an enigmatic silver box. (Photo by Donald E. Hurlbert)
Capt. William West was killed in 1610 around the age of 24 during a skirmish with the Powhatan. He was found buried with the remnants of a military leader’s sash adorned with silver bullion fringe and spangles. (Photo by Donald E. Hurlbert)
Capt. William West was killed in 1610 around the age of 24 during a skirmish with the Powhatan. He was found buried with the remnants of a military leader’s sash adorned with silver bullion fringe and spangles. (Photo by Donald E. Hurlbert)
A well-preserved silver box (shown before and after conservation) believed to be a Catholic reliquary resting on top of Capt. Gabriel Archer’s coffin was an unexpected find at the site of the 1608 Anglican church, suggesting that at least one of the colonists retained his Catholic faith, perhaps in secret. (Photo by Donald Hurlbert)
A well-preserved silver box (shown before and after conservation) believed to be a Catholic reliquary resting on top of Capt. Gabriel Archer’s coffin was an unexpected find at the site of the 1608 Anglican church, suggesting that at least one of the colonists retained his Catholic faith, perhaps in secret. (Photo by Donald Hurlbert)
This scan of William West’s captain’s sash reveals it is likely made of silk and is adorned with silver bullion fringe and spangles. (Image courtesy Mark L. Riccio, Cornell BRC CT Imaging Facility)
This scan of William West’s captain’s sash reveals it is likely made of silk and is adorned with silver bullion fringe and spangles. (Image courtesy Mark L. Riccio, Cornell BRC CT Imaging Facility)
The research team studied the unusual pattern of coffin nails from the graves and determined that Wainman and West were buried in uniquely styled anthropomorphic, or human-shaped, wooden coffins while Archer was buried in a hexagonal coffin. (Courtesy of Jamestown Rediscovery/Preservation Virginia)
The research team studied the unusual pattern of coffin nails from the graves and determined that Wainman and West were buried in uniquely styled anthropomorphic, or human-shaped, wooden coffins while Archer was buried in a hexagonal coffin. (Courtesy of Jamestown Rediscovery/Preservation Virginia)

Read More: JAMESTOWN SKELETONS IDENTIFIED AS COLONY LEADERS